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candiedmoon:

everything about this is pure gold.

candiedmoon:

everything about this is pure gold.

(Source: iheartladygaga, via thedragoninmygarage)

— 4 hours ago with 273025 notes
your-daisyfreshgirl:

stunningpicture:

Chinese doctors bowing down to a 11 year old boy diagnosed with brain cancer who managed to save several lives by donating his organs to the hospital he was being treated in shortly before his death.

Incredible

your-daisyfreshgirl:

stunningpicture:

Chinese doctors bowing down to a 11 year old boy diagnosed with brain cancer who managed to save several lives by donating his organs to the hospital he was being treated in shortly before his death.

Incredible

(via earthandanimals)

— 5 hours ago with 37144 notes
thehttydblog:

black-laced:

6 hours of work done by amessicle

ohh that’s amazing!

thehttydblog:

black-laced:

6 hours of work done by amessicle

ohh that’s amazing!

(via earthandanimals)

— 5 hours ago with 15287 notes
dendroica:

Avian Migration: The Ultimate Red-Eye Flight

Migration requires dramatic seasonal changes in behavior and physiology, and these changes must be timed appropriately for successful migration. In late summer after nestlings fledge, birds begin to molt, replacing their ratty old feathers with sleek new ones. They also begin to gorge themselves. The flurry of activity around this time of year reflects this frantic, single-minded pursuit of food. The birds’ hyperphagia, or excessive eating, is accompanied by great changes in body weight and composition. The birds get very fat—and then they are gone, en route to their wintering grounds on a journey of several weeks. They spend the winter in warmer climates, where resources are sufficient for survival. In late winter, they grow new feathers again; afterward, there’s another weeks-long period of hyperphagia. When the days get longer and the temperature is just right, they’re off again, migrating to summer breeding grounds. Upon arrival, males establish territories. Pairs form. Nests are built. Soon, eggs are incubating, then hatching, and parents devote almost all of their energy to feeding chicks. If time permits, parents may mate again and have another clutch. Then, the cycle repeats….
Migration likely brings to mind the familiar sight of geese flying overhead in their iconic V formation, honking stridently as they fly toward their faraway goal. But the migration of many birds is a rarely observed phenomenon. Most passerine birds, a group that includes songbirds and groups taxonomically related to them, migrate at night. Nocturnal migration has fascinated scientists and bird enthusiasts for a long time. What are the advantages for birds that migrate at night? How do they do it? When do they sleep? The answers to these questions are as yet incomplete. And often answers only beget more questions. Nevertheless, technological advances have facilitated a recent surge in migration research. A recurring theme of this work is that biological clocks are intimately involved in controlling nocturnal migration.

(Read more via American Scientist)

dendroica:

Avian Migration: The Ultimate Red-Eye Flight

Migration requires dramatic seasonal changes in behavior and physiology, and these changes must be timed appropriately for successful migration. In late summer after nestlings fledge, birds begin to molt, replacing their ratty old feathers with sleek new ones. They also begin to gorge themselves. The flurry of activity around this time of year reflects this frantic, single-minded pursuit of food. The birds’ hyperphagia, or excessive eating, is accompanied by great changes in body weight and composition. The birds get very fat—and then they are gone, en route to their wintering grounds on a journey of several weeks. They spend the winter in warmer climates, where resources are sufficient for survival. In late winter, they grow new feathers again; afterward, there’s another weeks-long period of hyperphagia. When the days get longer and the temperature is just right, they’re off again, migrating to summer breeding grounds. Upon arrival, males establish territories. Pairs form. Nests are built. Soon, eggs are incubating, then hatching, and parents devote almost all of their energy to feeding chicks. If time permits, parents may mate again and have another clutch. Then, the cycle repeats….

Migration likely brings to mind the familiar sight of geese flying overhead in their iconic V formation, honking stridently as they fly toward their faraway goal. But the migration of many birds is a rarely observed phenomenon. Most passerine birds, a group that includes songbirds and groups taxonomically related to them, migrate at night. Nocturnal migration has fascinated scientists and bird enthusiasts for a long time. What are the advantages for birds that migrate at night? How do they do it? When do they sleep? The answers to these questions are as yet incomplete. And often answers only beget more questions. Nevertheless, technological advances have facilitated a recent surge in migration research. A recurring theme of this work is that biological clocks are intimately involved in controlling nocturnal migration.

(Read more via American Scientist)

(via s-c-i-guy)

— 5 hours ago with 123 notes
storagegeek:

Bathroom Design 01 Mixed Media by Benjamin Bullins
Incredibly creative! I love the basket on the bike for towel storage. And you know, I don’t think keeping this clean would be too much trouble. Very whimsical.

storagegeek:

Bathroom Design 01 Mixed Media by Benjamin Bullins

Incredibly creative! I love the basket on the bike for towel storage. And you know, I don’t think keeping this clean would be too much trouble. Very whimsical.

(via likablegirlstuff)

— 1 day ago with 848 notes
fusrodrawblog:

About 95% done! Just need to add water, fish, and the flag on the small castle :)

fusrodrawblog:

About 95% done! Just need to add water, fish, and the flag on the small castle :)

(via txpure)

— 1 day ago with 158736 notes
edithjmodel:

Edith JAndrew Saxum
east side

edithjmodel:

Edith J
Andrew Saxum

east side

— 1 day ago with 178 notes
"Every day, think as you wake up, today I am fortunate to be alive, I have a precious human life, I am not going to waste it. I am going to use all my energies to develop myself, to expand my heart out to others; to achieve enlightenment for the benefit of all beings. I am going to have kind thoughts towards others, I am not going to get angry or think badly about others. I am going to benefit others as much as I can."
The Dalai Lama (via lazyyogi)
— 1 day ago with 1536 notes
In the beginning, god said

s-c-i-guy:

The four-dimensional divergence of an antisymmetric, second rank tensor equals zero, and there was light.

— 1 day ago with 37 notes